Maximize A Small Dated Bathroom

A small, out of date, bathroom is not going to kill you, especially if you are not looking to sell or take money out of your home.   But if your out of date bathroom is not functioning properly, you could be causing yourself and your home more problems down the line and that can spell trouble with an appraisal.

Case in point:  my small bath is original late 1970’s.  The tile in the shower again original.  The problem lies not in the small space or the yellow flowered tile but the lack of grout in several areas in the shower and surrounding areas.  I hadn’t noticed but water was starting to leak through these areas and not only was water starting to find its way to the basement, there was moisture getting trapped in the walls.  Not Good!

My small, out of date bathroom was starting to become more of a problem then just looks; my out of date, small bathroom was causing additional damage in the home.

It was time to go.  We needed to Maximize A Small Dated Bathroom Quick!

As we have talked in previous posts, knowing your neighborhood market area and what improvements your home can support is important before you start any improvements.  You don’t want to spend the time and money investing into a new space only to hear from your appraiser that you have an over-improved space.

The best way to learn what kind of improvements your neighborhood supports is to look at your neighborhood.  Look at similar sized homes with a similar age in your immediate neighborhood.  Then find out what kind of updates those homes have?  What additions and improvements are made to the bathrooms?

Finally, take a look at what the updated homes are selling for vs. the original homes?  And if it is necessary, look at other competing neighborhoods.

Along with looking at what improvements your neighborhood will support – take into consideration your needs and any possible life changes that might occur in the next 2 – 8 years.

Questions to ask yourself:

  • Is there a possibility of you needing to sell your home in the next 2 – 5 years?  . . . If so, you are going to not only want to consider your immediate needs but the overall appeal to prospective buyers.
  • Is your family size going to grow in the next 2 – 5 years?
  • How many people will be using this bathroom?
  • How do you use the bathroom?
    • Do you enjoy soaking in a tub?
    • Are you strictly a shower person?
    • Do you hate the cold floors in the winter?
    • Are you looking to create a spa experience or is this a space of strictly necessity?

Take a look at your needs and wants and what your neighborhood will support.  Then create a plan.

We have a dated small bathroom.  We needed to maximize that dated small bathroom.  We debated increasing the size of the bathroom but honestly the tiny house craze had me wondering why?  The bathroom is big enough for our needs but we needed to open up the space and maximize the functionality of the bathroom.

First on the list:  Entry Door

The bathroom door opens into the space, the space is small so flipping the door around to open into the bedroom would save space and be an easy, low cost fix.  We considered a pocket door but with the layout of the bedroom the door easily flowed well into the space.

Second on the list:  Vanity

The vanity has a single sink, is large and low to the ground.  I wanted a taller vanity and dual sinks.  (Note: You can buy standard kitchen cabinets for the bathroom that are higher)

Third:  Shower

The shower is big enough but the ceiling drops over the shower and the three sides are all walled and it feels very closed in.  We decided on cutting out the dropped ceiling, raising the shower head, creating a pony wall toward the toilet to open the space.  After much debate we also decided the small space needed a bang: A Mr. Steam shower and a frameless european glass would be a statement!  Mr steam logo

Those first three requests were the big priorities and everything else fell around them.

Some things I wish I would have known from the get go:

1 The bathroom is not a weekend project, especially if your contractor works for just a couple of hours and you do not have all of your components on site.

2 Order your components before Demo.  Our contractor kept saying we had time to order the vanity but when we actually wanted it here there was a shortage.  Waiting on a vanity is not fun!  Order early!

3 I exhaustedly researched steam showers.  I looked at the pros and cons.  I looked at the steam pods vs the separate steam generators.  I looked at the benefits of dry heat vs wet and finally settled on the Mr. Steam separate steam generator unit.  Something to think about when creating your steam shower is the bigger you go the bigger the generator and the more enclosed glass you will need.  After getting into the rebuild of the bathroom, I was really glad that I stayed with a small shower.  I was able to get a smaller generator (less cost) and although the european glass was expensive it wasn’t nearly as expensive if I would have created the shower across the entire back wall.

4 Not all European Glass is created equal.  I received three quotes for the European Glass.  All of the quotes were for the same dimensions and I was told all of the quotes were for a steam shower.  All of the quotes were significantly different in price.  And only one of the quotes would have been adequate for a steam shower.  The other two quotes said it was for a steam shower but they also stated water would leak here and there and if water is going to leak – your steam is going to leak and that is not ideal.  Beware of that when getting quotes for a steam shower.  If you live in Northern Utah and want a great steam shower go to Chuck with European Glass.  They will do a fantastic job!

European Glass Logo

Demo was fun and very interesting.  I was surprised by how quickly it went.  I was also surprised that it was up to me to dispose of everything.  (Note to self – next time arrange a dumpster prior to demo).

I was amazed at how much moisture was leaking from the shower.  The shower pan wasn’t even constructed properly – Luckily there was no mold or major repairs needed due to the leaks.

Without adding additional sq. footage to the bathroom it was amazing how much just flipping the door, raising the ceiling and creating a pony wall added to the space.  It felt larger, it opened the space and was a great start to the project.

From there it was fun picking out tile, the hardware and fixtures.  We decided to go with a grey concrete tile that we scored from Contempo Tile, that I have absolutely loved.  I want to add it to several other areas of the home as well.  We accented that with a textured charcoal accent wall and dark grout.Contempo

I have loved the effect!  Not only did we save ourselves a ton of money by not adding square feet, our small dated bathroom definitely got the make over and has become a maximized space.  The bathroom is large enough for our needs but has a cozy spa feel that works perfectly for our family.  And in case you are wondering, the Mr. Steam shower is definitely worth every penny!

See the results for yourself

Before:

IMG_6385IMG_6481 IMG_6388

During Demo:

IMG_6425 IMG_6424

After:

Bath 2015 2 Bath 2015 3

Bath 2015 5Bath 2015 6

Bath 2015 4 Bath 2015 7

One comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *